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Want to know how to make your Inner Rebel work for you?

Updated: Jan 29

We are a week away to the end of August already!


Time zips by regardless of whether we are on track with our weight loss or lifestyle goals, or not.


Do you have an inner rebel that works against you, stopping you in your tracks from sticking to your plan and reaching your goals?

I was recently talking with a friend about shopping for clothes. She and her sister think differently about shopping.


Their strategies for shopping and buying clothes are completely different. One feels resistance and dread to the whole experience and the other experiences it as a bright, engaging and nurturing way to self-care.


As my friend new she would be shopping with her sister, she decided to try on her sister's strategy. She imagined having fun, stopping for a special coffee, browsing the racks easily, pleasant conversation with her sister, lots of laughs and giggles.


To her amazement, she had a good time, bought some great clothes and walked away with a whole new perspective!


Shopping, she learned, could be a completely different, pleasurable experience!


What has shopping go to do with your inner rebel, weight loss and lifestyle habits/goals?


Well, it got me wondering what it would be like to think and feel differently about food and losing weight. What if our inner rebel could be harnessed to work for us instead of against us?


As it turns out, there are people who approach food and weight with a healthy, "normal" perspective. I know someone who enjoys good food and loves a small bite of dark chocolate daily.


For some, food is a source of nourishment, to be enjoyed and savoured. They plan their meals, based on what will taste good and is healthy; they eat when hungry and stop when full; and, they look forward to a tasty treat once and awhile.


There's been a lot of research about why some of us have issues with food - genetics, hormones, how the hypothalamus is over-ridden by the more feeling parts of the brain (the Amygdala), the impact sugar has on us, how dieting changes our bodies to make it difficult to sustain weight loss, and, of course, the impact of trauma and stress. www.eatingwell.com/article/9662/change-the-way-you-think-about-food/


Breaking a pattern of emotional eating and bingeing is possible but takes practice and commitment.


To make your inner rebel start working for you, write down your thoughts to these important questions:

  1. What was the trigger for you turning to food and emotional eating? What happened, internally and externally, that prompted you to take that first step to the fridge or cupboard? What were your thoughts and feelings?

  2. What's the payoff, benefit or end result? Since all behaviour is purposeful, this is an important question to answer.



Self-sabotage becomes increasingly harder when we know why we fall prey to emotional eating.


Awareness is key but only a start.




Don't let your inner rebel feast on a belief that you can't change.


Creating a strong belief in your ability to transform emotional eating is key to making your inner rebel work for you.


If you would like help in making your inner rebel work for you instead of against you, I am happy to share the tools and techniques I have used to make my inner rebel work for me.


I would love to see you achieve freedom from emotional eating and learn to Love Your Body-Love Yourself. There's nothing better than believing in yourself!


With Gratitude,


Joan

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Disclaimer:  As a coach I am not a licensed health or mental health professional and do not take the place of one.  I do not provide medical, nutritional, psychological or other services provided by licensed professionals or those who provide treatment or give professional advice. 

Please seek advice from a licensed clinician or physician if you are seeking a diagnosis or treatment for a physical or mental health concern.

 

The content of this website is provided for informational purposes only. Nothing contained in this site is or should be considered or used as a substitute for professional medical or mental health advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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